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Photographer’s gift shows Syria as it was

Photographer’s gift shows Syria as it was

June 6, 2017

Frank Kidner was a history scholar at San Francisco State University in 1993 when he took the first of what would be four trips to Syria over the course of a decade to study ruins dating to the Roman Empire.

Kidner documented his research in more than 9,000 photographs that detail architecture, topography, and the monuments themselves, focusing in particular on the Dead Cities region outside Aleppo. Read more about Photographer’s gift shows Syria as it was

Harvard Marshall Forum draws scholars, officials to discuss Europe then and now

Harvard Marshall Forum draws scholars, officials to discuss Europe then and now

June 5, 2017

At a time when American commitments to major global institutions and agreements are a hot issue around the world, the Harvard Marshall Forum celebrated the legacy of one of America’s greatest humanitarian outreach efforts: the Marshall Plan, $13 billion in U.S. aid to a faltering Western Europe after World War II.

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Marshall family’s 1950-61 impact in Kalahari explored in book

Marshall family’s 1950-61 impact in Kalahari explored in book

May 15, 2017

Striking in their beauty and their intimacy, the photographs the Marshall family made during their eight expeditions into the Kalahari from 1950 to 1961 have pure visual appeal. Landscapes of flowering fields or towering baobab trees and dominated by a majestic sky alternate with portraits of a family’s growth and change.

It is that change — beyond the stunning aesthetics — that mark these photos as special, forming the impetus behind “Where the Roads All End: The Marshall Family’s Kalahari

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Kennedy School fellow Ban Ki-moon reflects on issues of global concern

Kennedy School fellow Ban Ki-moon reflects on issues of global concern

May 12, 2017

After 10 years as secretary general of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, M.P.A. ’84, stepped away from the international stage at the end of last year. The onetime South Korean foreign minister remains active on global issues, including as the Angelopoulos Global Public Leaders Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School this spring.

The fellowship marks a return for Ban, who earned his graduate degree at the School as an Edward S. Mason Fellow. His current role involves meeting with students and collaborating with scholars, as well as lecturing, writing

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Harvard College student combines art, science, and public service

Harvard College student combines art, science, and public service

May 12, 2017

This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.

On the walls of Mather House hangs a painting by one of its residents. Julia Grotto ’17 has layered acrylic paint onto paper, transforming the exterior of the House’s Brutalism architecture in an intricate play of light and shadow.

The painting’s mix of light and dark also reflects peaks of achievement and valleys of

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Harvard president visits Southeast Asia

Harvard president visits Southeast Asia

May 4, 2017

Harvard President Drew Faust traveled to Southeast Asia in March, stopping in Singapore and Vietnam to meet with national education leaders, with Harvard alumni, and with schoolchildren, to whom she spoke about the opportunities an education can bring. Faust also spoke about the aftermath of war in a speech at the University of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Ho Chi Minh City.

1 Harvard President Drew Faust
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4 undocumented Harvard College students recount their journeys and their hopes

4 undocumented Harvard College students recount their journeys and their hopes

May 4, 2017

When Jin Park ’18 was growing up in New York City, his family always told him to be mindful of his surroundings, to keep quiet about being undocumented, and to avoid busy streets where he might encounter immigration agents.

Park can relax somewhat now because he can remain in the United States under President Obama’s 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). President Trump, a vocal critic of illegal immigration, nonetheless has affirmed the policy that keeps such students here and in school.

Still, Park worries about family members and

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Harvard junior aims high with lift from financial aid

Harvard junior aims high with lift from financial aid

April 18, 2017

Part of a series on the impact of Harvard financial aid on students.

Growing up in the tribal districts of Madhya Pradesh, India, Varsha Varman heard it all. Girls don’t play sports. They don’t dream of studying law, or imagine careers in politics. And attending a university like Harvard is little more than a fantasy.

Luckily, Varman didn’t listen.

The economics concentrator is nearing the end of her junior year, with a spot on the women’s varsity crew team and an eye on law school. One of the keys to

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Journey of Harvard College polyglot started with two words

Journey of Harvard College polyglot started with two words

April 17, 2017

This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.

Eni Dervishi ’17 has always been intrigued by language. “When I was in kindergarten, a teacher taught us how to say ‘chair’ and ‘table’ in English,” she recalled. “I found it fascinating that you could use two different words for [one] object.”

In her small Albanian town, language instruction was limited. But Eni was

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